White Tiger: The Color of Controversy

“An interesting reassessment of white tiger genetics and the politics surrounding the issue.” — Andrew Wyatt

Doc Antle's Tiger Tales

Royal White Bengal Tiger ~ ©Rare Species Fund Royal White Bengal Tiger ©Rare Species Fund

White Tigers are NOT Genetically Defective
There is no evidence of a genetic defect inherent in the white color variant of the Royal White Bengal Tiger, notwithstanding the erroneous claims to the contrary by the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) and the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA). White tigers have a normally occurring, simple recessive genetic color variant known as leucism, much the same as the leucistic (white) deer common to the Carolinas. Leucism and albinism are not the same. White tigers are not albinos and do not carry the genetic weaknesses associated with albinism. According to a recent study published in Current Biology, the gene, known as SLC45A2, is a naturally expressed color variant that was common in wild tiger populations prior to extirpation by poachers, hunters and habitat fragmentation in the 1950’s.

White Bengals result from genetic mutations that are part…

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One thought on “White Tiger: The Color of Controversy

  1. Very enlightening. I did not know that. I am somewhat familiar with homozygous and heterozygous colorations. Evidently my biology class at OSU was worthwhile. We had an exercise in polled and horned cattle to illustrate dominate and recessive traits.

    Working on any new and interesting projects?

    Hope you are well.

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